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CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
tongue] [speaking in native tongue] what >> thank you very much present member dhaka by law. it's a great pleasure to be reviewed. i feel so happy. thank you for your hospitality. this is my first visit as the president-elect of mexico, and i also want to congratulate you for your victory last november 6th for your second term as president to the united states and we wish you great success. i know you have a great task before you but i trust that you will be doing a wonderful job and i also want to thank you, president obama for having the vice president joe biden were go to mexico for the inaugural ceremony next saturday december 1st. i feel so pleased to be able to have the vice president biden represent you in mexico, and of course we are waiting for you in the delegation. >> [speaking in native tongue] the >> this is an opportunity we only have every 12 years. you will be starting your next four year term. i will be starting a six year administration in mexico as you know and i think this is a great opportunity for all of us to have a closer link of brotherhood and sisterhood an
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:30pm EST
court and constitutional law. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you, and thank you, david, for that gracious introduction, and all of you for a very, very warm welcome. this is my first visit to rice, and i'm already glad that i came. president lee told you i can't talk about anything current, future, or past. [laughter] my remarks will be brief. [laughter] i had the pleasure of knowing david for 35 years. as he mentioned, he was the president back then too of the harvard law review. he's used to holding the reigns of power. a chief justice also holds the reigns of power. the only difference is that a chief justice has to hold them lightly, less he discover they are not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps a faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to light a special vision, talent, and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 7:15am EST
." then professor anita hill. she's professor of social policy of law and women's studies at brandeis university and author of this new book, "reimaging equality: stories of gender, race, and finding home." welcome to you as well of [inaudible] >> and then hannah rosen, senior editor at the atlantic and found of double x and slate women's section, slate.com. she's also the author of "the end of men and the rise of women," hannah rosen, welcome. [applause] >> so will first start off with a couple minutes from each of you on either a brief summary or maybe a story from your book that you think best encapsulates the ideas that you are presented in these great works. governor kunin, we'll start with you please. >> thank you very much. it's great to see you all out there, and to be here with my sister authors. what's next for women, my career, my political life really started with the women's movement in the '70s, and we had great expectations, some of which have been met. the very fact that women today represents 60% of undergraduates that you see your friends, your daughters from her gra
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
jim crow laws that were oppressing people of color. that became the civil rights act of 1964. lyndon johnson was very much in support of that act. he had been opposed to some civil rights legislation early in his life when he was the representative here in texas. but as he said very pointedly, when he became president in the well-known speech, now that i have the power, i need to use it. never expected to be the president of the united states. he has to realize he's going to run over a lot of the senators and a lot of the representatives with whom he worked when he was in the house and senate. one of them was richard russell. his friend and mentor. a giant senator from the state of georgia who vehemently opposed the civil rights act of 1964. he knows he's going to have run over him to get this passed. and they have a very somber conversation. russell says lbj, you know, you can pass the sack. you have the legislative ability to do it. jack kennedy in, but you do. but i'm warning you, if you do, you will lose the democratic party to the south. you may well lose the presidency in the e
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
court and constitutional law. and while looking at china's political and economic and military power, and another on the situation in syria. >> one of the major effects on hurricane sandy was on telecommunications. that is our topic today on "the communicators." christopher guttman-mccabe is our guest today. mr. christopher guttman-mccabe, overall, what was the effect of hurricane sandy on your organization, verizon, sprint, at&t and etc. >> guest: thank you. i wouldn't mind taking a step back and providing a little perspective on this storm and the impact it had. mayor bloomberg said that the damage was unprecedented. but it may be the worst storm that the city has ever faced. and the previous title search, it was 14 feet. governor chris christie said the damage was unthinkable. we have buyers. we had hurricane force winds. we had massive flooding and if you look at that in the flooding of the subway system and the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you start to get the scale and scope of this form. and yet, the networks perform. i have read dozens of stories over the last couple of w
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 9:30am EST
the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 1980s. and how does that account for rising income inequality in canada? or even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? it is happening all over the world and the emerging market. it is important to face that squarely because if you see it just as a political phenomenon you are going to lose sight of what i think is a big challenge which is that these actually quite benign economic forces, and i love the technology revolution. are also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, how he sees it is the big drivers are probably the economic forces but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics, instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces, has exacerbated them. even if you have economic forces creating more concentration at the very top you expect politics to try to soften the blow, financial institutions to soften the blow and instead it is accelerating and to me that is
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
laws and it took four years, until 1944 when we invented the word teenager and the birth of 17 magazine. there is some irony that youth was invented by somebody in their 60's. the main lesson really is that the stages of life were essentially responsive to problems. they were solutions and it's ironic that g. stanley hal himself, the inventor of youth, who proposed 20 years later a new stage of life between midlife and old age. arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented the stage this stage iv people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period he had a a set of beautiful images and insight which i think actually makes a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described as period is an indian summer and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity and tell a shadow started slanting eastward, which i love. essentially has idea was that more and more people were reaching a point where they have the benefits of experience in the capacity to do something with it. wrote a book a couple of years ago co
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
here. he's in college at the present time here. what he wants to do is eventually go to law school and get his law degree and help people who were in the same situation we were in, but he can't even do that with a criminal record. once he gets his law degree, he still can't practice law until we're exonerated. >> you guys came here that day after you were released because i understand eddie vedder and his family -- i think eddie vedder's in a band -- [laughter] up and coming here in town. today brought you, they brought you here, right? and, like, took you shopping. >> eddie was, actually, in the courtroom the day we walked out. he came there just to be there for that. he brought us straight here. the day that we left arkansas, we left like refugees. i did not have a single penny in my pocket, i didn't even have a suit of clothes to change into. we had nowhere to go. so eddie brought us here, and his wife, jill, who's here tonight, um, took me out shopping and got me an entire new wardrobe, and i used to tell her eddie when he sees how much you spent, he's never going to let me back. [
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 2:45pm EST
become self-reinforcing, so you have more political inequality that generates laws and regulations that lead to more economic inequality, and that goes back into political inequality. the example i find astounding are something like our bankruptcy laws. something very technical. nobody normally gets interested in. one provision of the bankruptcy law is that when you go bankrupt, the question is, who gets paid first? that a big issue. the answer is, the derivatives. not a surprise. because they put it in when everybody else was not noticing who pays attention to bankruptcy laws? what does that mean? that means you encourage that kind of economic activity. but at the other extreme, student loans can't be discharged even in bankruptcy. so, that means that the banks do well, but it really discourages people borrowing for student loans, and in a country where we have tuition going up, in the last three years, average state university tuition has gone up 40%, because of the cutbacks in state budgets. incomes are going down, the only way that people can afford it is borrowing, and then th
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
historic legislation that he sponsored it was signed in to law by governor ginned l, it's been ruled unconstitutional. we had a similar kind of challenge in the state of florida. these are setbacks that require constant vigilance and continued work. there will be pushback galore going forward. if we stay true to these five principles, five ideas and we're faithful in the implementation we can reverse the trend and shake the complacent sei that exists in the country. one of the great challenge for our country is to raise accountability, raise standards to set higher expectations of what the next generation needs to know. benchmark it to the world. make it competitive with the world's best. michael talked about how great britain has done that successfully. the united states needs to transform its system of expectations in the same way. common core state standards is the right step in that direction. 46, i think, states have embraced the idea of fewer, higher expectations that require critical thinking skills that are benchmarked to the best in the world. common core will also bring out
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 1:15pm EST
not to pass pollution laws that would cause factories money. this is the way schools. it does not taxation without representation, i don't know what is. but unreasonable and inconsistent. it ensures that no one will adopt them accidently. they are thus a perfect pledge of allegiance. a lack of reason ensures that there must be continually repeated as such and that every possible instance or occasion be introduced by faith. should the leftists amid the obsessive incantations the repressed wis might actually -- accidently see also the marine recruiter who is or was thrilled to begin each sentence inmates response would serve. he was instructed. addenda invitations. this was noted by the psychologist in 1921 and notice the number of sandra. the individual overcome by the formerly is shocked into compulsive confession of his willingness to submit. as with houseguests and strangers, one of the liberal communities continually next with establishing his own a fides. and happy family o work environment or religious organization, community in short, what they've worked lacked -- this is th
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:15am EST
? >> the british constitution is so different from ours. it is an accumulation of laws and traditions and common-law over the years. there are subsets of the queen, that is what the term is. i need to ask that we cease asking questions temporarily. please the crowd for more questions from the audience. c-span will be here shortly to continue. they will be taking questions from the history and biography pavilion and also from national callers. please stay with us. we would love to have you
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
rigidity raised its head and the super committee deadlocked 6-6 which under the law left the meat cleaver to drop. the budget meat ax to drop. and that's what we're facing. we're facing something that nobody ever intended to go into effect. so how do we get out of this? we have people of goodwill that have to be reasonable and utilize a little commonsense, lessen their partisanship, lessen their ideological rigi rigidity, and that's the atmosphere that we can come together in. now, i want to tell a story and then i'm going to sit down, mr. president. i want to tell you the story about one of the brightest shining moments in government occurred back in 1983 when this senator was air youn was a youn. we were within six months of social security running out of money. and two old irishmen -- one who was president, his name was reagan; and the other one who was speaker, and his name was o'neill -- decided that they were going to do something about this. they were reasonable people who could operate in a bipartisan way and a nonideological way. and they said, what we're going to do is t
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
the law. >> i'm interested in your conversations as i always found with the national football league have the same situation. >> i'm not speaking for the national football league. >> the great thing under our cpa is the cost of workers conversation is actually borne by the players. so we live in a world under the cba with the insurance cost is basically estimated every year and that is a benefit that goes to the team. so the good news that these for our football teams and i'm always worried i'll say something good about nfl owners, but this is one of them. when it comes to the cost of insurance is something reimbursed. the world we live in the mix is somewhat ironic as even though costs are reimbursed, the teams nonetheless finds that workers comp, which is interesting. i could probably choose another word other than interesting, but it's a family show. i'm always interested in this issue of workers compensation, but going back to these big ideas, recognizing when our players get hurt, our leadership refuses to call it an accident. if you are a running back scoring up in ray lewis is
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 6:45am EST
risks. >> very cool that the three laws of robotic actually have to apply to the community. nothing to do with the robot that all but that is the challenge for us. >> exactly. we can't predict where technology is going. we can't -- all we can do is learn, try it on for size, see where it goes and adapt as a society and as governments to real threats rather than imagined ones. >> i'm feeling optimistic again. i remember when i was learning about the history of the internet, early internet doctor, grew up with computers and the dot.com bubble and feeling i had missed the boat on the technology revolution, all the great companies had been founded and there was nothing else to build or work on and i was a complete idiot and didn't see the possibility of the social web, everything that has happened, billions of dollars that were created, i missed the boat. we must have some people listening to this, the book has already been written, the movement is under way. that person thinking they missed the boat, how did they catch up and started? >> i hope no one is thinking that. the biggest industr
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:00am EST
when you're working with zoning restrictions or environmental laws and limitations, you know, you have to work within those confines. and the yeaiers learn something -- carriers learn something with every natural disaster or every storm that they face. they learn what is the right floor to put equipment on, what is the right floor to put -- how much fuel do you need, how many, you know, we call cows and colts which are cell sites on wheels or light trucks. and the carriers get better. they learn how to work with fuel vendors in advance so that they have this hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel in reserve. they learn how to coordinate with first responders in advance and before, during and after. we meet with fema and the department of homeland security and the fcc in advance of a storm like this, in the lead-up in the days, you know, while it's happening and in the days of after on multiple, multiple calls to make sure that the folks have their right credentials in the place to be able to get through blockades that public safety puts in place. so, you know, the investment is
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 8:00am EST
revision of the tax laws and serious debt reduction programs. he should encourage congress to enact an annual budget which has not occurred for the past three years. he might come up with a proposal for inventive public/private partnerships to improve infrastructure including the electric grid. and, of course, continue to encourage any energy independence. a resolution of the supply of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation this country so desperately needs. although it is not a subject of this paper, one can ask, will he be reelected? historically, rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term with popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. but so does romney. it is interesting to note that only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their re-el
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 10:15pm EST
protection of the law. the essence of the classical liberal philosophy is one of live and let live, all people are created with search and inalienable rights. the government does not dole out rates depending what religion you are, economic class you are in, what your gender is or theoretically at least what your orientation is. at least that is the way it is supposed to be. certainly most libertarians get that and that is why they have a special obligation to teach fellow conservatives invited center voters by gay americans deserve the same rights as everybody else. the second main theme of my book is because of this constant over-the-top rhetoric we hear from the religious right, most people have little understanding of what rank-and-file republicans believe about gay issues. the conventional wisdom is that all republicans hate gay and are opposed to gay rights. nothing could be further from the truth. >> from the 17th annual texas book festival on capitol grounds in austin, texas, h.w. brands discusses his book, the man who saved the union -- "the man who saved the union: ulysses gran
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 5:30pm EST
questions and doctrine and laws than you. i am not willing to suffer this people to be interrupted. you are rotten now with gentilism. the lord only knows what. i despise it as i despise the gates of hell. you ought to say mormonism is my controller. my governorship and everything else is to bow down to mormonism. it wouldn't have been really all that remarkable for brigham young to have browbeaten a fellow church member who was, perhaps, not acting in the church's best interest, but young had a larger purpose in mind. he delivered this harangue in the presence of the territory's new chief justice, associate justice, and secretary, all non-mormons. at one point, territorial secretary broaden harris, uncomfortable with the drift of the conversation, told young he had no interest in his dispute with babe bat. i want you to hear it, young stopped harris from leaving the room. a clerk recorded that it was a new scene for mr. harris to behold the power of the priesthood. two months later, all of those non-mormon officials fled utah convinced their lives were in danger. mormonism was a l
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
was on... >> guest: well, nixon knew that mrs. clinton, as a young lawyer fresh out of law school, went to work for the house committee working to impeach him, so he knew where she was coming from with regard to her view toward him. and he had a less than positive view toward her based primarily on her watergate experiences but also based upon what he perceived as her uncompromising liberal views. he thought that bill clinton would be more inclined to compromise than she would be. but nixon also had a high respect for people with great intelligence, and there was no doubt in his mind but that mrs. clinton is very smart. he just thought -- and the problem for nixon was that mrs. clinton believed in the wrong things, and that's bigger government. but nixon was also a very fair man, and when mrs. clinton did things right, and when she was good and strong and effective, he said so. but when she was wrong, which was most of the time for nixon, he said so. and an illustration of this, which i think this puts it in great light is when mrs. clinton did go to testify about the health care
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 8:15am EST
repeating the laws of supply and demand. this is where jane jacobs got it wrong for she looked at old buildings and new buildings and noted that old buildings were cheap while new buildings were expensive. which led her to conclude the right way to observe affordable and was make sure no one got any new buildings on top of old buildings. that is now supply and demand works. you don't need to look any further their own historic preservation district of greenwich village which you worked so hard to create. her home district which was affordable when she and her husband lived there in the 1950s has turned into a place where town has to start $5 million only hedge fund managers need apply. that's what happens when you turn off the chain of building new housing. one of the reasons why so important to nurture our cities is one way to enable our cities to grow, is the environment. i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate is beautiful spring day in 1884 with for a walk and he did a little fishing. fishing was good. there hadn't been much related to any came
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 8:00pm EST
age 18 to go to college, until the time he went to harvard law school, nine years, intensely tried to resolve the contradictions life threw at him in the way every teenager searches for identity. >> heƱhr had more things to rese than you and me. >> he was an integrated personality that gave him the confidence to get to the white house and got him in trouble in the white house, and john could document because he came into this thinking, well, if i resolve the contradictions life threw at me, why can't congress and the rest of the world? that gave him a sense of exceptionalism and a bit of naivety. i'm not saying he's completely naive, but that hurt him in the first period. >> only really in 2011, i mean, in 2009 and 2010, i think that the record is under estimated by people, and that he was -- >> certainly -- >> in some ways using a kind of what the princeton historian fred called the hidden hand of the presidency. why didn't he, you know, propose a health care bill and drop it on the steps of congress and say pass this, you know? he had the votes to do it. the reason he didn't do
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 2:00am EST
traffic law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but wha
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 5:00pm EST
the detention of united states citizens or lawful resident aliens of the united states or any other persons who are captured or arrested in the united states." now, that was just sort of to say, leave things as they are right now. it preserved the current state of the law, continuing to leave it to the courts to resolve who is right about whether or not the aoumf authorizes the military detention of united states citizens who are apprehended domestically. i believe strongly that the time has come now to end this legal ambiguity and to state clearly once and for all that the aumf or other authorities do not authorize such a definite detention of americans apprehended in the united states. this is without charge or without trial for year after year after year. to accomplish this, we are offering an amendment which affirms the continuing application of the principles behind the nondetention act of 1971. it amends that act to provide clearly in a clear statement that no military authorization allows indefinite detention of united states citizens or green card holders who are apprehended
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 6:45pm EST
jefferson was a good master and jefferson's son-in-law, who ran things around here when jefferson was away, was in charge, kind of an accident overseer. colonel randolph and going through the records i found that colonel randolph when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter, maria and salted -- soldier to an overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac did mention that in his memoir. why? i really don't know. maybe he told his interviewer and the interviewer to want to write it down. maybe isaac did what to say anything about hurt feelings of a white. maybe it hasn't left an impression on you just don't know and it leads like you guys had a lot of music that we really don't know and that the psychological, possible psychological distortions that took place under slavery is something we are still wrestling with. another person's memoirs are spent a lot of time with were those of peter fossae. he left to memoirs. he gave new super entities in the late 1800 -- 1800s rather. he was born here and was one of the slaves in the action of mr. je
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 4:30pm EST
protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which causes that god has given her the law given from god to the people and bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law in which it trickles down from the top. both germany and england had, not for a while but by the 20 century have more or less abandoned it common to many more such an inkling. by the end of world war ii, when you're unloaded however i'd willingly if colony, those colonies for themselves designed on principles of civil law. thus the first to pillars taken together mean that a christian protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about america's foundation of laws and defined system of personal rate. it wasn't just that the united states is a democratic republic, but that the very premises of a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the united states than any
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
states to change a law or reduce any capacity of our courts to uphold the constitution of the united states. and i think he did an important service in his comments with respect to to that. our fight is not over, we have some work to do in the next days and i look forward to working with him on that. mr. lugar: i join the chairman in thanking john mccain for his testimony, his courage, his eloquence, his mention of those on our side of the aisle historically who have fought for the disabled. that's a very important fact today, and his presence, his strength, and determination were very inspiring. we appreciate so much his testimony. mr. kerry: mr. president, i suggest -- the presiding officer: the senator from massachusetts. mr. kerry: i suggest the absence of a quorum and ask that time be charge against both sides. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. durbin: mr. president? the presiding officer: senator from illinois, the assistant leader. mr. durbin: i ask that the quorum call be suspended. officer without objection. mr. durbin: we are in th
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 12:45pm EST
-in-law who ran things around here when jefferson was away, cornel raldolf was in charge he was an executive overseer. he was a good master. it in going through the record i found that he -- when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter and sold him to overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac didn't mention that in his memoir, why? i really don't know. maybe he told his white interviewer and the interviewer didn't want to write it down. maybe isaac didn't want to say anything that would hurt the feelings of a white man. maybe it didn't -- maybe it hasn't left my impression. we don't know. it's not there. it leads one to realize that there is a lot in these accounts that we really don't know, and that the psychology possible distortion that took place under slavery that we are still wrestling with. another person's memoir who i spent a lot of time with was peters to et. he left two memoirs he gave newspaper interviews in the late 1800s. he was born here and he was one of the slaves who was auctioned in the auction of mr. jeffe
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
did i write this? i rode unlearning liberty because i went to law school, i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i had a russian father and a british mother and i came from that background realizing that the rule had to be that everybody got to say what they wanted to under the circumstances. the idea that, like, the government could understand what you said so it would be my mom or my dad in charge. in the general society free-speech said be the rule coming and i've always believed that. and so the history of the first amendment law we every class stanford offered indicted six additional credits of my own design on the history of the freedom of speech and despite all of that, i was utterly unprepared for the kind of cases i would see on the college campuses. utterly unprepared. and to dhaka little bit about this this is one of the reasons i wrote the book because it feels like banging my head against bill wall i'd been writing articles about this for my entire career, and i started get
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
i can tell you i left a law practice about eight years ago to work in education. i didn't consider whether i would work for a for-profit or nonprofit. i thought i want to go someplace and make a difference. i want to be a part of the solution. i took a pay cut to do that. people at learn it, i hard to hear quotes like that immediately for-profit is only stakeholder is the vest are tore or stockholder. for us at learn it we talk about we two bottom lines. we have an academic bottom line and financial bottom line and we can't fail on either. so we're very focused on student achievement and focused on making sure we're meeting the needs of those stakeholders which are the students, the families, the schools, the principals that we serve. so unfortunately i can't answer that exact question but i have to tell you we're here in this business because we want to make a difference and we're passionate about education. >> michael? to the point raquel just made, a skeptic of for-profits being involved in education, might say, well that is nice, if your heart is in the right place, okay but at
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 7:30am EST
immigration as well. we can call in the "wall street journal" wing. on the other hand are social and law and order conservatives who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and social order. to these conservatives, the presence of large numbers of people in the united states in violation of american law is inherently problematic. what's more, many of them aren't wild about the influx of large numbers of legal immigrants either, arguing that any culture needs sufficient time for new arrivals to assimilate and that cultures can benefit from periodic pauses in immigration. now, there's some other camps as well. for example, moral and social conservatives such as some in the catholic church and other religious groups who favor what might be called a light touch approach to immigration on what they believe are social justice grounds. but the broader point is there is a deep tension and division on the right on immigration, and there has been for decades now. now, the recent presidential election has brought the immigration issue once again to the center of american politics. g
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
justice john roberts and the supreme court and constitutional law. after that, part of our coverage of the halifax international security forum, including a look at the u.s. role in global politics and the situation in syria. several live events tell you about tomorrow morning. former florida governor jeb bush will be speaking at the foundation for excellence in education. you can once that event here on c-span2 at 845 eastern. just after that at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span three the foreign policy initiative begins a daylong symposium on foreign policy. such a look at congress, national security was arizona senator john kyl. then on c-span, a forum on energy policy hosted by the bipartisan policy center. former senators and byron dorgan. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> on 16 of 17 bases in the united states we have military-run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our bases use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay every public schoo
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 12:00pm EST
looking is not a physical invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the police officer himself did that if he went there with the intention of smelling at the door. he's going there to search, and he shouldn't be on the -- [inaudible] to search. >> i think it's been conceded in this case, at least it was below, that the officer could walk up there, report the smell of marijuana and that that was not a search. >> mr. garre, this is what we said, and i'm just going to read it. we said: we think that obtaining by sense-enhancing technology any information regarding the interior of the home that could not otherwise have been obtained without physical intrusion into a
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:30pm EST
ask you here. my oldest son also went to law school here. my younger son with his family, he lives here. my wife has an aunt and cousin who also appear. there are still very strong connections. tonight, i'm going to discuss abraham lincoln's role of 1860 to 1861. more specifically, i'm going to talk about abraham lincoln and how he rejected any meaningful compromise. in november 1860 after his election, the country was gripped because many southerners felt in the republican party, the republican party was in northern party and proudly so. they did not have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single electoral vote without any of the southern states. the first time in the nations history, a party without any notable southern components would be taking over the executive branch of the national government. but there was more. the republican party was probably a northern party. during its existence in the mid-1850s, the rhetoric had assaulted the south and racial slavery, their determination -- the republicans determination, were to win a national election w
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 2:30pm EST
agenda. then professor anita hill, a professor of social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis university and author of this new book, rematching equality, stories of gender, race, and finding a home. welcome. [applause] and senior editor at the atlantic and founder of women section. also the author of the end of man and the rise of women. so we start off with a couple minutes from each of you on -- a brief summary or a story from your book that you think best encapsulates the ideas that you are presenting. >> thank you very much. it is great to see you all up there and to be here with my sister authoress. what is next for women. my career, my political life really started with the woman's movement in the 70's. and we had great expectations, some of which have been at. the very fact that women today represent 60 percent of undergraduates that uc your friends, daughters, granddaughters becoming doctors to lawyers, things might generation cannot do. women are in the workforce like never before. the traditional family of that goes off to work, mom stance at the doorway wearing a p
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 6:00am EST
. this is the way law schools looked when i was coming out. when you first started teaching to the woman, when he lived in massachusetts he didn't just say professor, he said blake though you could really profess anything. i really rocketed me back. so i think in addition to the mockery generally and the electorate, in addition to the demeaning of women generally, you sort of have a celebrated when were hired, but it's also a double whammy in a political setting. >> i'm in washington. it's an interesting place. i love d.c., but when you look at the washington that we are talking about, when you actually go into the halls of congress and have a visual, the next time you look at something going on mtv that is showing one of the halls, just take a look at it. it will look different from this room. it's almost like a reverse of what we have heard about were the demographics of this country are going. so i just wonder how attached we are just thinking about what happened in the election this time. it's almost like read a sense, but what is actually occurring in terms of the change in the nati
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:30am EST
what the geneva convention said. the law of our complex is that, so that's what the rules of engagement. i make that a subject brigadier, what do you say? >> everything is more or less on it. chance of seven or collateral damage is ruled out very quickly. that does alter the judgment call. >> can i just go back, you talked about whether the are selling caches and so on, that investigations take place. as i understand if there's an ied, it may well be an investigation of another sort take place to see if there's forensics and do something about apprehending people, prosecuting them and so on. these investigations you describe, they presumably form part of a broader investigation and a discussion with the committee about the conflict in which incidents happen, is that right? if it's not right explain please what is right and who was involved in that process. on the afghans involved? of the afghan police involved? civil society involves? give us a bit of an insight into what those investigations would look like. >> let me start. whenever there is an incident, there is an investi
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 9:00am EST
college law school. we can't give up on that. this kid from east st. louis illinois and for many others, these loans make a big difference whether it's pell grants or loans, but let's look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid to education goes to for-profit schools. they have 12% of the students, 25% of the federal aid to education, and more than double the student loan default rate of any other class higher education. there are ways to cut back in spending in education particularly as is wasted on some of the schools that will give us opportunities for resources for real education. which can be part of our future. now let me come to the most painful topic of all, entitlements. social security was included in the simpson-bowles report but i didn't agree with every aspect of it, but i thought that was a sensible approach to breathing life into social security beyond its current longevity. i also like and it to 82 when asking your, and 83 and was told that social security is on its way out in six months, we'll be out of money. so we rolled up our sleeves, came up with a biparti
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 1:15am EST
way we think that people began to question the law that was passed as obamacare
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 6:00am EST
on booktv's in depth on c-span2. >> now a forum on the rule of law in sino, a panel that includes u.s. ambassador to china and jon huntsman. we will show as much as we can until our live event at 8:30 eastern. [applause] >> thank you for that very kind introduction. i have a great honor of being a distinguished fellow here at brookings but i can tell with justice brier and with these distinguished legal experts appear there's nothing distinguished about me at all. today i come pretty much as a regular fellow as opposed to any kind of distinguished fellow. what we have ahead is a great presentation by some people you will find interesting, about development of the rule of law in china. i wanted to offer a few introductory comments on the china relationship in general. may i first thank john thornton for your vision and support for the center and parking than the leadership you provide. and an extraordinary scholar, and every utterance and every monogram you put out is red and scrutinized by everybody. i just know somebody on the chinese side who write about candidates who run for t
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 12:00am EST
been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. now on booktv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david library for hosting me. to real it's a real pleasure to be here and to see all of you this afternoon. thank you. the title of my talk this afternoon is love and honor in 1812, patriotism and popular culture in the new united states. on june 19 of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said quote, i extort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as the feel wrong that they exert themselves. madisons call made clear that the expectations of showing love of country required gi
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
to give access to mechanisms for implementing international law. how does that look? >> i don't think any honorable member has given a successful explanation could this will only be resolved if there is a successful negotiation. i haven't heard anyone say any alternative that. there is a lot of willingness and desire to express opinions and to make gestures and so on. but no one has contradicted that. and if that is the case, that it requires a successful negotiation, then it requires us to encourage both parties into the negotiation to allow will need to do in the negotiation. that is a successful logic. >> thank you, mr. speaker. they played a role in obtaining a cease-fire. what do you suggest and bringing normality to this troubled region? >> absolutely. there is a major opportunity for the new egypt to do that now. last week, i congratulated him on the effort that egypt has made in the efforts on further negotiations. trying to open up gaza and prevent the smuggling of weapons. if that can be achieved, they can continue their efforts on broader issues. >> no one would doubt
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 5:00pm EST
matter of law you want us to hold and that training records are inadequate unless what? and less you want to specify at things call -- a list of things they have to include. >> discord in the number of circumstances has provided examples that can guide a court and perot will cause determinations. the test, the coor's specified where evidence can be so strong that it substitutes for evidence on another prong. the court pointed to a wealth of knowledge that can be relied upon such as the winter climate. >> you are defending a florida supreme court opinion which says must. you cannot just say, you know, i am not asserting any particular thing is necessary, adjusted tell the. you have an opinion here in which the florida supreme court says must. it must include, you know, the feel of things. you disavow that or you want us to ignore it? >> that is not the holding on which i am relying here. the holding and which i am relying is that training and certification alone, the mere fact of training and certification alone is not sufficient to establish the dodger liability. and hence the langua
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 7:00am EST
country so that the ability to use the laws we already have on both are available to everyone, not just the rich and famous? >> i think my right honorable friend makes an important point about access to justice, but i think one of the key things that the leveson inquiry is trying to get to the bottom of is how can you have a strong and independent regulatory system so that you don't have to wait for the wheels of the criminal justice system or the libel system to work. people should be able to ally -- relight a good regular system to get the redressed they want whether that is apologies or fines for newspapers or the other things that are clearly so necessary. >> the department of education is going to shut down with the loss of 101 jobs at lee's which is in 27 -- [inaudible] cannot ask the prime minister how this is going to help unemployment and social deprivation in my constituency likes the secretary has refused a meeting on this matter. >> i know they haven't met to discuss this and it certainly discuss this with the secretary of state as well. of course, there will be consultation
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 9:00am EST
agreement in early 1997, committing to open private markets and competition and rule of law. the agreement and the private market competition it launched help spur in the years that followed trillions of dollars in new investment, in infrastructure, in telecommunications around the world, and help spur a huge certainly unprecedented wave of worldwide telecommunication technology innovation, mobile and internet. global access to communications service rose in the years following that agreement, especially for mobile services in developing countries that took the opportunity to leapfrog past wired networks. between 2001-2011, mobile phone adoption increased globally from 15% to 86%, one decade. from roughly 900 million people around the world having basic mobile service to 6 billion, in a decade. now, the u.s. benefit from this global growth, u.s. export in information and communication technology services quadrupled over that decade. and as a global market continues to grow as we get those new metrics that i described, mobile broadband access went from one to 5 billion, the u.s. e
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 8:00pm EST
to be a law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> imacs, author and lecturer, kenneth davis, cleaned author of the don't know much about serious talks about history, geography and more. the selling off there has written 12 adult nonfiction books including the hidden history, and nation rising and is 2012 release, "don't know >> host: author kennetn presidents." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did they don't know much series of books come from?t th where did that idea come from? >> guest: the idea came fromtleg my own little brain, although it didn't start out as theh series. it started out with the idea that i loved american history, wanted to write about it. i wanted to write about in a way that shared my enthusiasm for a subject i've loved since i was a small child. the title came of course you and sam song, which i knew from childhood and so it got stuck in my head. and certainly the success of the book, which caught me by surprise more than anyone else perhaps led to the beginning of the series. she outgrew followed and on and on it went from there. so with no prete
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 3:30pm EST
industries and the right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government at a time when the united states was involved in a cold war with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
find astounding is the bankruptcy-law. nobody normally is interested. who gets paid first? of the derivatives. they put it in when nobody else was notice same. who pays attention to bankruptcy laws? so you encourage economic activity. student loans cannot be discharged. even in bankruptcy. the banks do well sell it has tuition going up the tests of the cutback of the state budget. and come is going down but the only way people can afford it is the borough then they get she did as a lot of them have been particularly with the for-profit private schools. the results is if you don't get a job with the recession it is a news around your neck. >> host: teachers. what ehud telling people looking at those tuition bills and unemployment? >> >> this is so rare is the 1% to the extent they're not coming from the 1% by getting generous scholarships. >> i certainly have relatives who are urging them to not be dependent and then nephew thank god teaching english and we're urging him to stay there until the job market is better but we move off the question of the current depressing economy but
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 2:00am EST
. in pennsylvania at the time was an interesting law. if the slave is in the state for more than six months, he was emancipated. washington had to move his slaves back and forth between mount vernon and philadelphia to keep them from being emancipated , even though this is absolutely against the letter of the pennsylvania state law. so that is the side of the story we often don't tell. a man of his time, absolutely. during the revolution when he takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still
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